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Women in the Archives Research Guide

Yellowstone

Yellowstone National Park is an integral piece of Montana's rich and vibrant history. It is one of the main collecting foci of Archives and Special Collections, and the archives contain many materials dealing with the Park. A good deal of the personal accounts of the Park were written by women on vacations or trips. Investigate these below!

Edna Tracy White Papers

Among a variety of other materials, the White Papers include a diary detailing Sarah J. Tracy's reminiscence of a trip through Yellowstone National Park and several newspaper clippings regarding Yellowstone National Park.

Emma Rosser Diary, 1888 August 28-1888 September 10

The Rosser diary traces Emma's tourist journey through Yellowstone with her two companions, "Louisa" and "Budd." Rosser describes the countryside and activities of another traveling party called the Severns. Also mentioned are "Yankee Jim" (James George) and a soldier known as Dick Hunter. 

Bernice M. Koch Scrapbook, 1931-1934

The Koch scrapbook documents her experiences as a Yellowstone "savage," the term used for seasonal workers in the park. The scrapbook includes photographs, letters, an autograph book, and miscellaneous other items.

Fannie Louise Davis Ennis Speeches and Essay Transcripts, 1964

Among other materials, this collection contains two of Ennis's speeches dealing with Montana history. "Atlas Club Speech" is a simple history of Montana and Yellowstone with no personal information about Ennis. Similarly, "Beloved Pioneers" is a superficial overview of Montana history. Both contain Ennis's thoughts on Yellowstone.

Yellowstone Park Diary, 1913

Myrtle May Kauffman's diary details her six-day trip through Yellowstone with her mother as part of a larger tour through the Northwestern States. Topics in the diary include geological facts, geographical features within Yellowstone, wildlife, accomodations, staff, and traveling companions.

May G. Flanagan Papers, 1887-1952

The Flanagan papers contain a variety of materials and information on Flanagan's life. Of note is a transcribed diary detailing a Yellowstone trip taken in 1903 with May's sister Virginia. This diary contains descriptions of natural features in Yellowstone.