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Instructional Services at MSU Library

Let the library help integrate critical thinking and information literacy into your curriculum!

Information Literacy Curriculum

Information Literacy Curriculum

Developing information literate students is the central mission of the MSU Library’s instructional services program. The Information Literacy Curriculum has been developed with the following aspirational goals in mind. These aspirational goals were informed by the new framework’s dispositions and “address the affective, attitudinal, or valuing dimension of learning” and are reflected in the accompanying rubric.

Getting Started with Research and Inquiry

Students will be able to design research projects as a process of inquiry by using authentic questions, curiosity and a willingness to challenge previously held beliefs in order to make new discoveries.

Exploring Strategically

Students will be able to demonstrate persistence, flexibility, and patience when finding information. Learners will recognize that sources of information vary greatly, including in format, perspective and values.  

Evaluating Authority and Value

Students will be able to assess content when encountering varied and sometimes conflicting perspectives in order to find authoritative sources. They will recognize that authority may be manifested in unexpected ways and that they bring their own biases and worldview to the research process.

Contributing to the Scholarly Conversation

Students will be able to participate actively in the research conversation, acknowledging multiple facets of conversation, and treating other participants with respect by properly citing past research and accurately representing creators’ intended meanings

LOWER DIVISION

UPPER DIVISION

Getting Started with Research and Inquiry

  • Determine an appropriate scope of investigation and narrow/broaden topic and inquiry questions based on personal interest, findings, assignment details and timeline.
  • Translate inquiry questions into keywords and search terms that are effective for searching.  (UM)
  • Persist in information searches despite challenges and sometimes conflicting information. (UM)
  • Recognize when help is needed and display willingness to seek help from appropriate experts. (UM)
  • Recognize that as new academics they are becoming contributors to the ongoing scholarly conversation.
  • Formulate questions for research based on information gaps or reexamination of existing, possibly conflicting, information.
  • Summarize the changes in scholarly perspective over time on a particular topic within a specific discipline.
  • Evaluate the value of inquiry as a way of knowing.
  • Display a willingness to confront prejudices and seek information sources that do not agree with their prior knowledge and position.
  • Apply and/or adapt research methods from others in the discipline that are appropriate for the need, context, and type of inquiry.
  • Connect original inquiry with the scholarly conversations in the discipline and understand participant’s roles and responsibilities.
  • Recognize their rights as a member of the academic community to freedom of intellectual inquiry and inviolate privacy in accessing library collections and services. (UM)

Exploring Strategically

  • Match information needs to appropriate search strategies and tools.
  • Apply a range of effective strategies to find related sources.
  • Design and refine needs and basic search strategies as necessary, based on search results. (UM)
  • Recognize and assess the value of distinctness of information resources (e.g., website resources, online journals, print material). (UM)
  • Use different types of search language (e.g., controlled vocabulary, keywords, natural language) appropriately.
  • Utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) and convergent (e.g., selecting the best source) thinking appropriately when searching.
  • Recognize and explain issues of access or lack of access to information sources.  Critically examine information privilege and discuss informational imbalances. (UM)
  • Design and refine needs and advanced search strategies as necessary, based on search results.
  • Use a variety of research methods, based on need, circumstance, and type of inquiry. (UM)
  • Identify appropriate associations, publications, and scholars in the discipline. (UM)
  • Use advanced search strategies and discipline-specific search tools and language. (UM)
  • Collect and organize sources in order to effectively manage, share, and cite research.

Evaluating Authority and Value

  • Use research tools and indicators of authority to critically evaluate information, assessing the reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, impact and point of view or bias of information sources. (UM)
  • Trace citations and links back to original sources. (UM)
  • Recognize the cultural, physical, social and historical contexts of an information source in order to understand how they influence the content.
  • Acknowledge biases that may privilege some sources of authority over others. (UM)
  • Assess the fit between an information product’s creation process and a particular information need.
  • Critically evaluate contributions made by others in participatory information environments.
  • Identify gaps in research; compare and contrast research arguments, data, studies and methodologies. (UM)
  • Distinguish different types of authority, such as subject expertise (e.g., scholarship), societal position (e.g., public office or title), or special experience (e.g., participating in a historic event).

Contributing to the Scholarly Conversation

  • Organize information in meaningful ways, appropriate to audience and context.
  • Give credit to the original ideas of others through proper attribution and citation.
  • Accurately represent creators’ intended meanings when quoting, paraphrasing and contextualizing their work.
  • Synthesize ideas gathered from multiple sources.
  • Draw reasonable conclusions based on the analysis and interpretation of information.
  • Combine new knowledge with prior knowledge to create original scholarship. (UM)
  • Articulate the purpose and distinguishing characteristics of copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain.
  • Understand the increasingly social nature of the information ecosystem where authorities actively connect with one another and sources develop over time.
  • Make informed choices regarding their online actions in full awareness of issues related to privacy and decide where and how their information is published, posted, viewed, shared and/or reused.